Aloe Vera contains 75 potentially active constituents: vitamins, enzymes, minerals, sugars, lignin, saponins, salicylic acids and amino acids.



It contains vitamins A (beta-carotene), C and E, B12, folic acid and choline.


It contains 8 enzymes: aliiase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, bradykinase, carboxypeptidase, catalase, cellulase, lipase, and peroxidase.


It provides calcium, chromium, copper, selenium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium and zinc.


It provides monosaccharides (glucose and fructose) and polysaccharides: (glucomannans/polymannose). These are derived from the mucilage layer of the plant and are known as mucopolysaccharides. The most prominent monosaccharide is mannose-6-phosphate, and the most common polysaccharides are called glucomannans [beta-(1, 4)-acetylated mannan].

Acemannan, a prominent glucomannan has also been found. Recently, a glycoprotein with antiallergic properties, called alprogen and novel anti-inflammatory compound, C-glucosyl chromone, has been isolated from Aloe Vera gel.


It provides 12 anthraquinones, which are phenolic compounds traditionally known as laxatives. Aloin and emodin act as analgesics, antibacterials and antivirals.

Fatty acids

It provides 4 plant steroids; cholesterol, campesterol, β-sisosterol and lupeol. All these have anti-inflammatory action and lupeol.


Auxins and gibberellins.


It provides 20 of the 22 human required amino acids and 7 of the 8 essential amino acids.

It also contains salicylic acid that possesses anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties.

Lignin, an inert substance, when included in topical preparations, enhances penetrative effect of the other ingredients into the skin.

Saponins that are the soapy substances form about 3% of the gel and have cleansing and antiseptic properties.